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the fruited plains america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good with brotherhood ♪ ♪ from sea to shining sea ♪ >> so appropriate to have the prayer from father coughlan, roman catholic faith was central to the life of senator kennedy, even when he strayed or sometimes crashed off the straight and narrow life, he always came back to the church. that's his son, patrick, you see in the foreground, standing at the hearse, the body of his father. >> thank you very much for attending. eternal rest granted unto him, oh, lord, and let perpetual life shine upon him. may he rest in peace. may his soul and outlet souls of the faithfully departed to the mercy of god rest in peace. ame amen. >> senator bobby byrd talking with lawrence schribe in the background. there was no detailed program for this part of the motorcade. so, we'll ask you to bear with us. we don't know quite what to expect next. i think that might have been the conclusion of what they wanted to do here, give an opportunity to the senate staffers to come out. pat leahy, senate of the judicial committee i
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
't see coming, stand up! come on, follow me. well, hello, america. there is a revolution that is happening in this country, and it's one that most people aren't really aware of. it has been happening for a while. we will get into that in the next few minutes. the most transparent white house in history, however, hasn't answered any of the questions. of course, he was on vacation, so we should wait. maybe he will do it tomorrow. we asked a lot of questions last week, tough questions like why does the president have so many marxist, socialist radicals and a self-proclaimed communist advising him? i'm still hopeful that there's a simple explanation, but i don't think so. maybe he just wasn't aware of their radical beliefs, you know. after all, he sat in reverend wright's pews for 20 years and didn't catch on to the fact that wright isn't too fond of america or what was he called it, the u.s. k.k.a. of america. so here is the one thing of tonight. it is not an accident. president obama's radical advisors are there for a reason. they are fighting a revolution. it's not the kin
america who have been inspired by her exceptional life story. we celebrate the greatness of the country in which such a story is possible. and we celebrate how with their overwhelming vote to confirm justice sotomayor the united states senate, republicans and democrats, tore down yet one more barrier to affirm our belief that in america the doors of opportunity must be open to all. and what that what, the senate look beyond the old division and they embraced excellence. they recognized justice sotomayor's intellect, ability, and presence of mind. a response -- her responsibility to each role in government. her fidelity to the law in each case that she hears, and her dedication to protecting our core constitutional rights and liberties. justice william brennan said that in order to ensure all these rights for all sentence, we must be attentive to the concrete reality is at stake in the decision before then. they must understand the pulse of life beneath the official version of events. justice sotomayor understands those realities because she has witnessed them firsthand. as a prosecutor,
," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- china expresses its strong opposition. it does not like tie 1's invitation to the dollar llama. and he sailed around the road, but he is not old enough to drive. a british teenager complete the voyage. -- and he sailed around the world, but he is not old enough to drive. hello to you. bbc has discovered many cases of corruption involving iraqi security forces. the police and army are widely blamed for failing to stop the current wave of bombings. there is concern that there is endemic corruption undermining their efforts. two months ago, they took over responsibility for security in iraq as american troops pulled back. the life-and-death question now -- can they prove they are up to the job? we have this report from andrew north. >> the attack on the foreign ministry. a suicide bomber last week. seconds before it detonated it right outside. the foreign minister tells us the iraqi army, police were partly responsible. >> the iraqi security forces should have done a better job because there w
their patriarch. the last brother from the family that is as close to political royalty as america has ever seen. i'm ed schultz. welcome back to msnbc's continuing coverage of the passing of senator ted kennedy. senator kennedy died in overnight hours in his home surrounded by his family, including his wife and children. nbc's anne thompson is at the kennedy compound in hyannisport, massachusetts, where well-wishers have been gathering since early this morning. anne, any word yet on funeral arrangements? >> ed, we do not know what the funeral plans are. we hope to get that information later today or perhaps as late as tomorrow. we can tell you this morning, we have seen a roman catholic priest drive into the compound. we have seen other various people go into the compound this morning, but we have not seen any family members that we recognize. we do understand that last evening, as the senator's health deteriorated, his extended family gathered here at the family compound at his -- his house which was rose and joe, his parents' house and that when he died, he was surrounded by his immediate fam
believe that elizabeth and i both agree that there needs to be comprehensive health care reform in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. and i hope that it's a bipartisan one that i think can be passed energy. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in a quazi insurance company of its own? >> we can pass health care reform without what is commonly referred to as a public option, which means to compete with your private insurers, with united health care or aetna or blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the option of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass any kind of reform without that public option. for a lot of reasons. one of the things we want to do is make certain we're providing to 46 million americans who are uninsured to 25 million who are underinsured, a way of getting reliable, transparent and cost effective, accessible -- cost accessible insurance. the way you do that is make certain y
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
with the seawall with his finger. the fable has it parallel in debate on modern values. this time it is america that is trying to put its finger in the dike. to hold back the tide the tide of liberal values spilling over from europe espially from that same small country abutting the north sea with his 16 million dutch citizens. practitioners of a secular values called quote-unquote personal autonomy. the netherlands was the first country to legalize the right to die known as u euthanasia. and dutch has same sex marriage soft drugs, prostitution, and coffee shops that serve hashish. question, are americans destined to take our values cues from the dutch. well jew deyo christian be pushed aside for personal autonomy. is the jesus of bethlehem destined to be side lined by the doctrine and practice of personal autonomy. are we all going dutch? >> we'll ask these experts. paul sar bin, and steven plo ploerow. rabin, and steven ploerow. ploerow. >> plott row. announcer: if. for such a small word, it packs a wallop. if i live to 100. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she say
to an end. the extraordinary good that he did lives on. to his family he was a guardian. to america, the defender of a dream. >> after the assassinations, he became the family patriarchç ad eventual become an american political icon. for nearly five decades in the senate, kennedy was the leading voice of his party's liberal wing. at the 1980 convention speech, it was a kennedy classic. >> for all of those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the hobe still lives and the dream shall never die. -- the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. ♪ >> love him or hate him, and there are still some ted kennedy haters out there, it is safe to say that washington will not be the same without him. he died this week at the age of 77 at his home in massachusetts. he was diagnosed with a brain tumor in may of 2008. we knew and he knew that there was no cure, only delaying action. >> there will be again a new generation of americans and i hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> despite his condition, the kennedy made an appearance at barack obama's convention in denv
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
-- to boost relations between america and of those countries. >> our team coverage continues with kate live in the studio. >> maryland officials highlight senator kennedy's accomplishments, the work he did, and the way he did it. >> i present to this convention, senator edward kennedy. >> she cochaired his 1980 presidential campaign and introduced into the crowd at the national convention. in a conversation on wednesday, she shared memories of her colleague and friend. >> ted kennedy had the courage of his conviction. he had such a great gift of working across party lines. it being willing to compromise without compromising his ideals. that is what he would want us to do now. >> across maryland, leaders pause honor his legacy. >> [unintelligible] >> from the moment of silence at the city hall to the courts in annapolis. >> my condolences go out to the kennedy family, the shriver family, and the towns and family -- townshend family. >> he said, i saw firsthand his dedication to build a society for america. it will be deeply missed. many officials called kennedy a hero and a mentor, including
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
the rewriting of america's restrictive immigration laws, drafted in the 1920s. he fought hard for the immigration and nationality act of 1965, signed by president lyndon johnson. and as america inches toward majority-minority status, with the descendants of european immigrants a declining share of the population, the face of today's america is the one kennedy's efforts helped create, for better... >> i think it is fair to say that senator kennedy was one of the architects of the america of the future. >> suarez: ... or for worse. >> the '65 act put american immigration on auto-pilot. >> suarez: by the time of the john kennedy administration, america had absorbed the huge ellis island generations of immigrants who poured in from europe from roughly 1880 to 1920. president kennedy, whose great- grandparents came to boston from ireland, supported scrapping the existing quota system that used 19th-century america's ethnic makeup as a template for letting in new arrivals, favoring europeans and effectively sealing off newcomers from the rest of the world. on the senate floor in 200
, gorgia. he visited not just thafrican- america community but he went to the southwest ad visited with mrant workers. tavis: whatou mak of the fact there was the specialond between ted kennedy and his others and africaamericans? knowing your hiory, here you ara poor country boy from alabama, and there are aot of othe country black folk back in the y or be funded byhese rich white guys from massachusetts. -- who were defrded by these rich white guys from massachusetts. how was that? -- to work beiended by these rich ite guys from massachusetts how was that? >> it may have appeared be strange, ty could travel to e delta missiippi and georgia you cou see a picre, especiallyfter the assassinion of dr. king and john knedy, the would bea picture of jn f. kennedy, rert kennedy, martinuther king jr., and picture jesus. vis: i haveome church fans in my personal collection evybody who would go to ts churches would seehose pictures on tho fans. i was thought itwas azing that it wld be in churches all acrs america. >> have some of those al. somehow, in some way,hese men gave peop a sense of
that it would be in churches all across america. >> i have some of those also. somehow, in some way, these men gave people a sense of hope in a time of hopelessness. tavis: you were there, one of e ft ld dr. king. we know that you were beaten and almost killed on a number of locations. you were the youngest person to speak at the march on washington on that day where king gave the "i have a dream" speech. your resume is intact and regard to your duty and service on the civil rights front. because you were there, you were there, and dr. king was not always happy with john kennedy or bobby kennedy. edward kennedy seemed to take a different tact. what you make of that? >> -- what do you make of that? >> we were not always happy with the president of -- the position of president kennedy or robert kennedy, but along came brother teddy kennedy, who bitterly as a senator threw everything that he had, his soul, his heart, his guts into supporting strong supports legislation and to be a voice. i think he learned from his brothers that we could do better, and he wanted to eat -- one of the strongest pie
. >>> tonight, i'm going to take the liberty to speak to millions of liberals across america. it's been a sad day in america. we lost our man, senator ted kennedy. lost his battle with brain cancer overnight at the age of 77. every time he was on my radio show, i referred to him as the gladiator. he loved that. he was the gladiator for the people. a fighter, a believer. he fought for labor, for worker's rights, civil rights, human rights and social justice. kennedy was the gold standard when it came to fighting for the working folk of america and he left a huge footprint in this country. he was a champion of the cause, an unselfish man who gave so much to the united states of america. but i will remember him as a fighter. now, there's a lot of talk today about his ability to cross the aisle, his bipartisanship, his work, his friendships but he never compromised his principles. he fought for them passionately. if ted kennedy was on your side, he would be in the trenches with you in the 11th hour. you could count on kennedy. >> we still cannot get a $2.15 over two years. over two years. what is
america's coastline? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning to you again this morning. i'm diane sawyer in times square. robin is on assignment on this thursday, august 27th. and chris cuomo is anchoring our coverage from hyannisport, massachusetts. chris, good morning. any signs the family is stirring this morning? >> good morning, diane. i don't think i've ever been able to say this before, but the kennedy compound is quiet. and talking to family members, from youngest to oldest yesterday, they all remember teddy the same way. he was there for them always. and now, they are make sure they are there for him. the family is literally, taking shifts, holding vigil, over teddy's body, making sure the man who they love is never alone. even in the final moments, he showed his strength. >> there was a certain peace there that was absolutely beautiful. >> reporter: now, loved ones are gathering at the family compound to mourn and celebrate. >> that's what we're going to do in the next few days. celebrate his life, a wonderful life. >> reporter: a family who played in the surf wh
. this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday of october on c- span. >> president obama goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed
>>> good morning, america. this morning, a brand-new abc news poll show nows more than half of americans approve of president obama's health care plan. is the president about to go into gladiator mode to get it passed? >>> outrage at the heroes welcome the lockerbie bomber receives after his release. we asked, why did great britain do this? >>> storm surge. the latest on the path of the giant hurricane, bill. >>> stalled on the highway. some popular foreign cars are suddenly just shutting down in traffic. an exclusive "gma" investigation. and this morning, a recall. >>> and need more sleep? 70 million of us do. and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the test. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, here with david muir this morning. robin is away. chris is away this friday, august 21st, 2009. and there's a tsunami of outrage, pours over great britain this morning. >> all of the pictures pouring in. a hero's welcome for the bomber of the lockerbie pan am flight. al
and i mean america really falling back. i mean, america really declining. i mean opportunity slipping away. sound -- founded fierce? unfounded fears? >> the reason they're unfounded is because there's a disconnect between the people who are leading this country and the people who are supposed to be leading. a new poll shows that 70% of americans would favor less government and lower taxes. their attitude, that tastes great and it's less filling. that's what they'd really like to see. but the government and, look, republicans have to take some blame on this because they help set some of this stuff up with the tarp bill last fall. but when you start having a government that ignores the people, holds them in contempt, makes fun of them, calls them a mob -- sean: when did this ever happen? >> ridicules them. the divide gets greater and greater but clearly there's something not getting through to the people in washington, d.c. sean: governor, everything that the government seems to touch is bankrupt. i'm using a term government derangement syndrome, that in spite of the post office failing
. jimmy paige. you broke a string. good morning, america. >> good morning. it is sunday, august 23rd. >> yes. >>> despite big rains, pounding surf. looks like we dodged a bullet, new england dodged a bullet. hurricane bill, the first hurricane of the season is heading towards canada, safely offshore. there are ramifications. tropical storm warnings to talk about. we'll bring you the latest, coming up. >>> also, the wildly popular cash for clunkers program comes to an end tomorrow. pumped hundreds of millions of dollars into the economy. sparked the flailing auto industry. but it's had a positive ripple effect on another industry. we'll tell you what you might call a secondary stimulus. >>> also, the international manhunt under way for the reality tv star, who was accused of murdering his ex-wife and former "playboy" model. investigators think he has fled the country. we'll have details on that. >>> also, cutting-edge medical equipment. really cool. giving people in small towns access to a big city doctor without leaving their hospital. it's a robo doc. >>> first, we want to get the l
kennedy can be measured in no small part as a consequence of how we in america look at one another. how blacks look at whites, how gays looked straight, house traits lookit days. -- house streets look at today's -- how straights look at gays. and how we look at ourselves. when you were with him, you had to measure yourself against him. it always requires you to be larger than you were inclined to be. his death was not unlike his life. as we all know. overcoming pain and loss with a sense of dignity and pride that is amazing. he met his death in the same grave, generous terms that he lived his life. they could've been thinking about your father when he wrote, the will the fis fear when duty throws the gauntlet down the fate, when scorn compromises with death. this is heroism. your father was a historic figure. he was a heroic figure beyond that. i will remember and celebrate his life every single time i see a young, adolescent kids coping rather than cowering about having to make a decision about his sexuality. i will celebrate your father ever single time i see my granddaughter stand up
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
health and it is bad for the economic health of america. my husband had alzheimer's disease for 10 years, and sadly he died last year. but i had the freedom to talk to his doctor and participate in his treatment. i would lose that freedom under this bill. some panel of bureaucrats would decide what his treatment would be, and whether or not it would be cost-effective. i agree that our american health care needs reform, but we can do lots of things to improve our present health care. i don't think we need to throw out our present health care and have a whole new government system. i am totally against the government taking it over. [applause] i wanted president obama to succeed, but i am not terrified at the way -- at the direction at this country under president obama, harry reid, and nancy pelosi. they have spent billions of dollars in the last few months, and we're trillions of dollars in debt. congressman connolly, you are our representative. you represent we the people. i implore you to vote no on this bill, preserve our freedom, and prevent our country from sliding into economic rui
looked around and i saw america. i saw white people and i saw black people. and i saw men and i saw women and i saw english-speakers and spanish-speakers in our caucus. our diversity is our strength. and when you have a diverse group the way you create solidarity is through shared values. the kind of discussion we have when a vote comes up that seems like a tough vote for me because the way my district is or because i just have problems with them on the basis of conscience, the discussion is always on the level of what's right, what's good, what's right, never, what's in it for me, what's in it for the leadership? it never takes that kind of turn. and the democrats don't vote as a single bloc and some close and some unpredictable. we had a couple that took a long time to vote. but the net result of that is that through our diversity, we have our strength. now, you compare that to the other side which seems to operate on completely different principles. doesn't have anything even remotely resembling diversity in our caucus and it seems to fight the very idea of diversity. i remember one si
, the son of one of the wealthy men in america at the time, where did this concern for others me from? >> to whom much is given, much is expected. he joined th senate and hi brother ha just promised a civil rights bil he did n see it through. he was there. ted kennedy ce along at the time that t civil rights movement was at its heig. he was the to see this civi rights legislation moved through,n my opinion, into law. he was a fiter for civil rights than an he remained all the wayhrough. one thingeople do not rember, it was the behind-the- scenes kenny who was really interested in the people. for emple, during the vietnam wawhen they were talking about bringing home -- gettingut of vietnaat the end there was a closed-door briefing and the geral was talkg about how thewere going todo this eaking in tes of uni that woulbe moved between theipeline to gethem out othere. nnedy said, it a minute, general, we are not talking out units or pipelines. we're talking about people. that was the kennedy siature. e really saw the peopleehind the numbers. >>in 1968 he was somewhat ambivalentf the war.
that excited for anything. >>> for some of you, your local news is up next. >> for everyone else, "america this morning" continues after this. hi help you? we're shopping for car insurance, and our friends said we should start here. good friends -- we compare our progressive direct rates, apples to apples, against other top companies, to help you get the best price. how do you do that? with a touch of this button. can i try that? [ chuckles ] wow! good luck getting your remote back. it's all right -- i love this channel. shopping less and savingore. th'progressive. call or click today. clean so deep... ...it's like your old mop's worst nightmare. ♪ [ thunder crashes ] [ man ] love stinks. ♪ love stinks! ♪ yeah! yeah! [ female announcer ] swiffer wet cloths clean better than a mop with new cleansers that attract dirt deep into the cloth and lock it away. new swiffer wet cloths clean better, or your money back. ♪ love stinks! i felt this deep lingering pain that was a complete mytery to me. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia muscle pain and then he recommnded lyrica., fibromyalgi
"america the beautiful." from here, the family will get back in the motorcade, and the hearse will make its way to arlington national cemetary for a sunset burial. >> glor: as nancy mentioned oa hill in arlington national cemetary near the graves of his brothers, john and robert, ted kennedy will be laid to rest this evening. wyatt andrews reports on how that spot was chosen. wyatt. >> reporter: jeff, good evening. it has long been ted kennedy's dream to join his brothers jack and bobby here at arlington national cemetary. but the story of how this political family came here to this military cemetery is one that began by accident. the kennedys' appreciation for arlington started when president john kennedy decided to take a random sunday drive. it was march of 1963, eight months before his assassination. >> it was a late day, a late winter day. >> reporter: according to journalist and author robert pool kennedy happened to sdrif to the cemetery and then decided to walk this hill. >> he walked to about where we are. >> reporter: as the president absorbed the view overlooking the lincoln memo
been a place of retreat and renewal for america's greatest political dynasty. now they remember a patriarch, and this town remembers a friend. sam barber sold him paintings. >> i'm going to miss him terribly. i'm speechless. >> reporter: ted kennedy's father bought a cottage here in 1928, thinking it would be good for the kids' health. three decades later, ted's brothers john and robert purchased surrounding homes, creating this three acre property simply known as the compound. john is the editor of "the last lion." >> for years of his life, this was the home. this was the one home they kept returning to. they lived in new york, massachusetts, london, england, but for john, this was his anchor. >> reporter: the brothers played their famous games of touch football on the lawn here, training for the youngest brother, a star at harvard. >> i think this was the center of his young world. so many things happened here. certainly, in times of tragedy, this is where the kennedys gathered. >> reporter: a place of mourning too many times for the kennedy clan. ted was there in 1999 when he
at 7:00. don't forget, wusa9.com. a few hours ago this campaign came to an end. >> couric: america mourns the lion of the senate. >> we on this side are interested in protecting american servicemen from the close fire of a civil war. >> couric: the man who carried the torch and the burden of a political dynasty. through triumph, tragedy... >> my brother need not be idealized or enlarged in death what... beyond what he was in life. >> couric: and scandal. >> for this reason i would understand full well why some might think it right for me to resign. >> couric: and leave the legacy of landmark legislation that changed millions of lives. >> the work goes on, the cause endures. the hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> couric: tonight, the life of senator ted kennedy. captioning sponsored by cbs good evening, i'm katie couric. this is the "cbs evening news," there is, of course, no royal family in this country. the kennedys, perhaps, the closest we've ever had. for the past 40 years, senator edward kennedy was the patriarch, the last surviving brother of a political dynasty until
, thrill, to be part of the best economic news story in america." that's interesting, because a lot of auto dealers don't share that sentiment. they're out millions waiting for the rebates on cars they have already sold under the program. two are joining me now. matt luzio from flemington, new jersey and job puglisi, part of the samsung auto group that operates more than a dozen dealerships in new jersey. thanks for coming up. you are both out of a lot of money. matt, how much are you waiting for the government to send you? >> close to $600,000. eric: representing how many cars? >> 130. eric: how about you? >> 300,000 dollars and about 150 cars. eric: the program says they're supposed to send you back that money within ten days, right? you have already been paid? >> we have been paid on three cars. >> we have been paid on no cars. eric: a total of three have been paid. are you nervous? >> yes. eric: what are you nervous about? what could possibly go wrong? >> we're nervous that we're sitting on an outlay of cash that's not in our business. it is difficult to manage the business without that
kennedy, a man who fought passionately and pragmatically in the senate. >> he challenged our america, and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, warren hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut, share their personal memories. plus senator maria wall of washington on the post-kennedy debate for office. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talked to the president and ceo of the red sox, larry laquino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. senator andrews gets the last word. "state of the union" report for sunday, august 30. >>> a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the eulogy in saying goodbye at arlington cemetary. here is a reflection on senator kennedy's life, oren hatch of utah and senator christopher dodd. se
's reaffirming of america in terms of its values and ideals and the power of the constitution feared that to me is the greatest joy for any writer and journalist and that's the story and try to tell in my books. >> host: we talked about the books you have written. what is next? >> guest: and house -- i am fascinated with malcolm x and wondering if it is time to look again at malcolm x and also given the tremendous diversity of the american population today i'm interested in the founding fathers of this new america. we have seen books about the accounting bothers of america as it emerged in 1700's. i think this time again is to look at a founding fathers of this new america and one represents to the world. >> host: dui d.c. to read about these issues or is it a challenge? >> guest: writing is the greatest intellectual exercise. my -- trained a boxer's nose around people the exercise and had to show tremendous courage on their side, but remained engaging in a buck and the ideas getting those ideas to be real on the page so others can understand that and engage them to me it is my maximum energy a
it as part of cspan's america and the courts saturday at 7:00, eastern. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago this weekend, half a million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder will take us behind the scenes. that will be at 9:00 p.m., eastern, on both tv. >> how is cspan funded? >> donations? >> federal funds, grant funds? >> maybe contributions. >> austin, i don't know. >> i would say from commercials. >> advertising? >> something from the government? >> 30 years ago, america pause cable companies created cspan as a public service. it is a private business initiative with no government mandate, no government money. >> while we wait for live coverage of the netroots convention in less than one hour, conversation with one of the conservative bloggers meeting in pittsburgh this weekend from this morning's " washington journal per-ql." host: tell us what you are representing. guest: i am here to talk about conservative activism on line and become larger participants. people across the country can act with one voice. host: we have been checking with rep
the worst run insurance companies in america. they predict he merged them they were poorly run and turn them into the biggest efficient. he is a doctor. he created the biggest insurance company in america for his shareholders. his stock went from nothing to being a very valuable. if you are a shareholder, you probably thought he got a lot of that out of nothing. he turned into an $80 billion company. it is nice to have shareholders who are mutual fund owners investing in united healthcare. he had a lot of stock in 1992. on paper, you can never defend anybody making a billion doctor -- dollars. it is very large, very comprehensive, and its shareholders were rewarded. it is like the government paid it. there are two sides to the story. . he created a massive company. he was in it very early. again, i'm not trying to defend him. certainly the taxpayers never paid united health care $1 billion. they are the single biggest contractor for medicare. they make on average about a 3.5% profit on their part d plan which is drugs and plan which is drugs and probably a 4% margin on their medicare advanta
, to america. how would you feel after you get it? two people who just got the vaccine yesterday are joining us next. steve: he cannot stay out of the spotlight. disgraced illinois governor blagojevich channeling elvis. >> ♪ kiss me once. (announcer) this is nine generations of the world's most revered luxury sedan. this is a history of over 50,000 crash-tested cars... this is the world record for longevity and endurance. and one of the most technologically advanced automobiles on the planet. this is the 9th generation e-class. this is mercedes-benz. ♪ bicycle, what are we waiting for? the flowers are blooming. the air is sweet. and zyrtec® starts... relieving my allergies... 2 hours faster than claritin®. my worst symptoms feel better, indoors and outdoors. with zyrtec®, the fastest... 24-hour allergy medicine, i promise not to wait as long to go for our ride. zyrtec® works fast, so i can love the air™. >> [1brian: nancy pelosi calling average americans to show up at the town hall meetings un- american. the white house tells senators, if you get it, we will punch back twice as hard.
. uncompensated care in america cost $43 billion. you and i pay that tax. now, -- i want to address the 47 million who do not have health care coverage, to bring them into the system and that can help lower cost by having a bigger risk pools. the second thing i want to do is having meaningful cost of health care reform. let's start with medicare. i want to close the doughnut hole on prescription drugs. i want to make sure all of our seniors have access to the medications they need and that no one in america over 55 or 65 casta make this terrible decision, to lead by a meal or the prescription drugs that i need? yew instead both the there are some specialized prescription drugs that cost a lot of money. i want to make sure a catastrophic illness does not bankrupt families in america. in our district alone, the 11th congressional district, last year, 1430 families filed for bankruptcy because of health care costs. any family in america, young or old, could be one accident or one illness away from catastrophic health care costs. capping health-care -- catastrophic costs so that the family is forced i
, in your face. welcome to town hall america. take a look at what happened when senator arlen specter held a town meeting today in lebanon, pennsylvania. >> you want to be let out of here, you're welcome to go. wait a minute. now, wait a minute. now, wait a minute. now, wait a minute. wait a minute. wait a minute. >> i have every right to -- >> wait a minute, wait a minute. he has a right to leave. >> wow. a similar scene played out later this afternoon when senator claire mccaskill held a town meeting in hillsboro, missouri. add in the protester with the gun strapped to his lower leg who showed up at a church near the town hall event that president obama held in portsmouth, new hampshire today. it's legal to carry the gun in that state, but this is what happens when the demagogues turn up the heat and the angry people come out in force. they start to tune in. that protester will be on the show to explain what he was doing with a gun near the president's meeting this afternoon. >>> also, ewe nice kennedy slifer, the sister of john f. kennedy died today. we will talk about the kennedys and
the president took no active part in the campaign, he left in the middle of one of the america's cup races to vote at boston's joy street police station. he had no comment on his brother's victory but political observers were quick to point out that the younger kennedy's race in november will be more than a local issue. >> a man who cares. edward m. kennedy endorsed democratic candidate for the united states senate. >> too many of our senior citizens are being forced to choose between neglecting their ailments or being p auchlt perized by them. >> vote for edward m. kennedy, the endorsed democratic candidate for the united states senate. >> the congress convenience. there are some new faces on capitol hill. among them are 12 new senators. of most interest is senator edward "ted" kennedy, the third brother to achieve success in the national political arena. >> from dallas texas, president kennedy died at 1:00 p.m. central standard time. 2:00 eastern standard time. some 38 minutes ago. >> making a final stop on his tour of ireland, senator edward kennedy finds 100,000 people in the streets t
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